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Diagnostic Imaging

X-rays

Radiographs (also known as x-rays) are a very important tool to help us diagnose diseases in animals, particularly for conditions involving bones, the chest or abdomen. Most of our patients that require x-rays are admitted for the day. We will ask that you bring your pet in unfed on the morning of admission, as they will most likely be sedated or anaesthetised to allow us to take the best quality radiographs possible. Once the radiographs have been taken we will give you a call or book an appointment for our veterinarians to show you the images and to discuss the diagnosis and treatment plan for your pet.

Ultrasound

Ultrasounds are useful for imaging soft or fluid-filled organs; like the liver, kidney, bladder and heart. Depending on the nature of the ultrasound, your pet may need to be admitted into hospital for the day. The area to be scanned will be shaved, so your pet may look different when they come home. During the scan a water-soluble gel is applied over the clipped area to be examined and a transducer (probe) is placed on the skin. Once the scan has been done we will give you a call or book an appointment for our veterinarians to show you the images and to discuss the diagnosis and treatment plan for your pet.

Pregnancy X-ray and Ultrasound

To satisfy curiosity and to allow preparations to be made for the new arrivals, it is a good idea to confirm pregnancy. An ultrasound at 4 – 5 weeks after mating is an easy way to diagnose dog pregnancy early. It cannot tell you how many puppies are present. X-rays can confirm the number of puppies; however the skeletons do not show up on x-ray until week 8.

Endoscopy

An endoscope is either a rigid or flexible tube with an attached video camera which allows live footage to be viewed on a connected screen. An endoscope will allow your veterinary doctor to visually examine your pet’s lower gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract, without the need for invasive surgery.

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